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Mikyla Wagner recognized at Capitol for Veterans photo

Posted on Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 11:13 am

Shown, from left: Community R-VI Art Teacher Darla Deimeke, Kayla Rutherford, Mikyla Wagner, and Lexa Cope.

Shown, from left: Community R-VI Art Teacher Darla Deimeke, Kayla Rutherford, Mikyla Wagner, and Lexa Cope.

Missouri Alliance for Arts Education (MAAE) was held on Thursday, March 31 recognized as Fine Arts Education Day, a celebration of elementary, middle, and high school arts programs.
Mikyla Wagner, of Community R-VI High School, was awarded first place in the 10th District Senate Art Exhibit along with her Art Teacher Darla Deimeke at the Capitol Building in the Rotunda. Her photograph was part of a Veterans Project done last fall. Senator Jeanie Riddle presented the award and Wagner was introduced to the senators during session.
Attending the recognition were both families of Mikyla and Mrs. Deimeke as well as Lexa Cope and Kayla Rutherford.
The awarded photo was featured along with the best in elementary choir, spoken word presentations, brass ensembles, and performing arts. All activities were held in the Rotunda and South Steps of the Capitol Building in Jefferson City.
MAAE Executive Director, Ben Martin, said there is vast educational importance to promoting arts in the schools and recognizing it throughout the school year.
“More and more evidence is surfacing about the positive impact that robust arts programs have on schools and the students who attend them,” said Martin, a retired theater teacher out of the Lee’s Summit School District.
“High achieving students, more often than not, are actively involved in arts education. The more that connection is honored and celebrated, the more likely it is that other schools, students, and their parents will recognize the benefits of arts education.”
According to the MAAE Study of Fine Arts Education in Missouri School Districts, graduation rates, math scores, and English language scores all excel in students with a higher than average enrollment in fine arts classes.
Disciplinary rates can be 33% less for those same, arts-engaged students.