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Former Vandalia officers receive forgery charges

Posted on Wednesday, August 23, 2017 at 1:07 pm

Two former part-time Vandalia Police officers found themselves on the other side of the law last week when they were both charged with felony forgery crimes for time sheets when working with the department.
William Jones, age 44, and William Parker, age 38, were both arrested on Audrain County warrants last week for five counts of forgery. They each had $50,000 bonds set for them.
A court appearance is scheduled for 10 a.m. on Tuesday, September 5.
According to a probable cause statement, Vandalia Detective/Captain Donald Elkins was instructed by Vandalia Police Chief Christopher Hammann to open an internal affairs investigation into irregularities in the department regarding possible time card fraud and evidence handling.
It was noted there were numerous erroneous claims from one minute to 45 minutes that are not part of the final report for both officers.
Officer Parker had five charges of erroneous timesheet claims.
• On March 22, 2016 he reportedly claimed 30 hours. The radio log showed around 4.75 hours but his time sheet showed eight hours. So he was paid for 30 hours and not 26.75.
• On March 27, 2016 he claimed 23 hours. Radio logs show 3.25 hours but his time sheet reflected eight hours. So he was paid for 23 hours and not 18.25 hours.
• On July 5, 2016 Parker reportedly claimed 39.5 hours. The radio log showed him on duty for 2.75 hours but his time sheet showed 6.75 hours. So he was paid for 39.5 hours and not 35.75.
• On October 22, 2016, he claimed 13.5 hours of duty though the radio log showed him off duty. A hand search of training records discovered nothing. So Parker was paid 13.5 hours and not 5.5.
• On November 4, 2016 the radio log showed 3.75 hours though the time sheet reflected seven hours. So he was paid for 20 hours and not 16.75.
Officer Jones
• As for Officer Jones on March 20, 2016, the radio log showed him not being on duty though the timesheet shows eight hours. He worked just 3.5 hours on March 21, 2016 and his timesheet reflected eight houts. Also on March 23, the radio log shows nine hours and his timesheet reflected 10 hours. So he was paid for 26 hours and not 12.5.
• On June 17, 2016 he was reportedly not on duty but his timesheet showed 10 hours. It again happened on June 20, 2016 as he was not on duty but his timesheet showed six hours. So he was paid for 32 hours and not 16.
• Count 3 reference August 25, 2016 where the radio log showed him on the clock for about 30 minutes and a timesheet claims five hours. Timesheet claims total 34 more hours for five other dates in one week in which there was no radio log time for the 40 hours of pay.
• In late September, he claimed 32 hours in spite of working just 14 during a particular week.
• On October 8, 2016, he was not on duty but the timesheet shows six hours. So he was paid for 26 hours and not 16.5.
radio log showed him not being on duty though the time sheet shows eight hours. He worked just 3.5 hours on March 21, 2016 and his timesheet reflected eight houts. Also on March 23, the radio log shows nine hours and his time sheet reflected 10 hours. So he was paid for 26 hours and not 12.5.
• On June 17, 2016 he was reportedly not on duty but his timesheet showed 10 hours. It again happened on June 20, 2016 as he was not on duty but his time sheet showed six hours. So he was paid for 32 hours and not 16.
• Count 3 reference August 25, 2016 where the radio log showed him on the clock for about 30 minutes and a time sheet claims five hours. Time sheet claims total 34 more hours for five other dates in one week in which there was no radio log time for the 40 hours of pay.
• In late September, he claimed 32 hours in spite of working just 14 during a particular week.
• On October 8, 2016, he was not on duty but the time sheet shows six hours. So he was paid for 26 hours and not 16.5.
Attorney Blake Markus, from Carson & Coil, P.C., is representing both officers.
He says the officers dispute the validity of the claims.
Markus added that the two officers have a bunch of records that have never been asked for by the Vandalia Police Department or the investigating officer.
He also said his clients have never been questioned by the Vandalia Police Department on the alleged forgery claims.
Markus also noted that the previous police chief signed off on the time sheets and has never reportedly been contacted by the Vandalia Police Department or the investigating officer.
As always in such cases, those charged are to be presumed innocent until proven guilty.