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COVID-19 causes major disruptions in businesses and government

Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2020 at 12:06 pm

By Clay Coleman

VANDALIA—To understand how to combat the coronavirus, one must first understand how the disease spreads. There are only two ways the virus can transmit from one person to another.
The first method is by respiratory or droplet infection.
That’s where an infected person sneezes or coughs near someone else; the droplets are inhaled through the respiratory tract, and now that person has the virus.
The second method is from hand to face transmission.
Say that an infected person sneezes into their hand before opening the door to a restaurant. You follow him a short while later, open the door, and have a slice of pizza. Well, you stand a chance of getting the virus. The coronavirus can stay on surfaces like doorknobs for up to three days.
That’s why where we eat is so important.
I contacted Dairy Queen, The Spiced Apple, Great Plains Kitchens, and Goodfellas, Monday, and their managers informed me that they had increased the frequency they disinfect surfaces, and they and their employees wash their hands. They are also seating customers further apart.
The Spiced Apple has suspended its buffet and is updating its Facebook page.
Dairy Queen is prepared to limit operations to just the drive-thru, or carryout only.
Great Plains Kitchens has a working drive-thru window customers can use.
And Goodfellas has increased the frequency of handwashing and dishwashing.
More importantly, each business is looking ahead and doing its part to limit the spread of the virus in Vandalia.
On the subject of food, County Market has made changes to its operations and placed restrictions on some products.
Just last week, the store was out of items like ground beef, milk, and bread, but has since been restocked. Because of the possibility of high demand, County Market is limiting milk and bread sales to two apiece, and customers are only allowed one carton of eggs, per visit.
The store is open for seniors from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. vTo understand how to combat the coronavirus, one must first understand how the disease spreads. There are only two ways the virus can transmit from one person to another.
On the subject of food, County Market has made changes to its operations and placed restrictions on some products.
Just last week, the store was out of items like ground beef, milk, and bread, but has since been restocked. Because of the possibility of high demand, County Market is limiting milk and bread sales to two apiece, and customers are only allowed one carton of eggs, per visit.
The store is open for seniors from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m.

Assisted living facilities and nursing homes put measures in place to protect residents
As the coronavirus spreads throughout the country, those at risk for contracting COVID-19 are people over 65 years old, who also suffer from preexisting conditions like heart disease, diabetes, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema.
Because of this, the Tri-County Care Center (TCCC) and Countryside Manor, both assisted living centers located in Vandalia, have placed restrictions on family member visits, package deliveries, and have updated caregiver protocols.
Until further notice, TCCC and Countryside Manor will not allow anyone outside of caregivers and staff, entry into the facility.
Family members are encouraged to facetime, text message, or email their loved ones, and both facilities will work with those residents who don’t have smart phones, or a computer. Family members will be allowed to visit with a resident through a window.
Residents can still receive mail or newspapers, but packages like clothing, flowers, and food, will not be permitted into either facility.
Caregivers and staff are required to have their temperature taken before starting their shift. They will not be allowed inside if they present with flu-like symptoms.
Contact TCCC at 573-594-6467, and Countryside Manor at 573-594-6215, for more information.

What area hospitals are doing to slow the spread of COVID-19

A coronavirus is a group of viruses that cause a variety of diseases, from the common cold to severe respiratory infections like pneumonia in humans. It’s called coronavirus because, under a microscope, the upper portion of the cell looks like a crown.
Symptoms are difficult to pin down because the virus can progress in so many different ways. For the majority of people who come into contact with SARS-CoV-2, symptoms will include a mild cough, slight fever, body ache, and fatigue. You feel sick for 5 or 6 days; then, it’s gone.
But for people 65 and older, who are suffering from conditions like heart disease, diabetes, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema, coronaviruses can mutate into severe diseases like MERS, SARS, and the current one, COVID-19. These people will require ventilator support and are usually placed in the ICU.
There are two ways someone can spread the virus, droplets transmission through your respiratory tract and getting the infection on your hands and touching your mouth, nose, or eyes. This is why it’s essential to self-isolate if you feel sick.
For the majority of people who get the virus, very little in the way of treatment is required. Over the counter medications to fight the symptoms, rest, and to stay hydrated is usually sufficient. But for those whose symptoms progress to high fever, chest pain, or difficulty breathing, they need to contact their healthcare provider immediately.
Here is a list of medical facilities and their current operations:

Dr. Crisanto Galberto
Patients experiencing flu-like symptoms, or have recently traveled, must call the clinic before coming in. Patients with flu-like symptoms will be provided a mask at the door.

SSM Health Clinic
Travel surveys during the screening process.
Asks that patients who feel sick, or who are presenting with flu-like symptoms, contact the clinic before coming in.
A sanitization station is available at the entrance.

Hannibal Clinic
Visitors will be screened before entry into the clinic.
Recommends bringing only one visitor with the patient per appointment.

SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital
Anyone experiencing flu-like symptoms with a travel history to any country or states with active COVID-19 outbreaks should call in advance before coming to a clinic, urgent care, or emergency department for testing or treatment.

The hospital has closed the main (north) entrance as well as the outpatient rehabilitation entrance. All patients and visitors will be required to enter through the Emergency Room. They will be asked screening questions before admittance.

Only two visitors are allowed in a patient room at a time.
All visitors must be in good health (no signs of respiratory infection, such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, or sore throat).
Children under age 12 are not allowed.

Hannibal Regional Hospital
Visitors with flu-like symptoms will not be allowed to visit patients.
If showing signs of the flu, Hannibal Regional recommends contacting the hospital before an office visit.

Boone Hospital Center
Visitors who are experiencing flu-like symptoms cannot visit until they return to health.

One visitor at a time for each patient, including:
Inpatient care units.
Emergency departments.
Intensive care units.
Outpatient surgery and procedure areas.
Medical offices and clinics.

Two visitors at a time are permitted in obstetrics and pediatrics.
Visitors under the age of 16 are not permitted, including siblings.
All visitors will be asked screening questions.